Outside of a human cell, HIV exists as roughly spherical particles (sometimes called virions). The surface of each particle is studded with lots of little spikes. A HIV particle is around 100-150 billionths of a meter in diameter. That’s about the same as: Microns,4 millionths of an inch, one twentieth of the length of an E. coli bacterium or One seventieth of the diameter of a human CD4+ white blood cell.

Unlike most bacteria, HIV particles are much too small to be seen through any ordinary microscope. However they can be seen clearly with an electron microscope. HIV particles surround themselves with a coat of fatty material known as the viral envelope (or membrane). Projecting from this are around 72 little spikes, which are formed from the proteins gp120 and gp41. Just below the viral envelope is a layer called the matrix, which is made from the protein p17.

The viral core (or capsids) is usually bullet-shaped and is made from the protein p24. Inside the core are three enzymes required for HIV replication called reverse transcriptase, integrate and protease. Also held within the core is HIV’s genetic material, which consists of two identical strands of RNA.

HIV belongs to a special class of viruses called retroviruses. Within this class, HIV is placed in the subgroup of lent viruses. Other lent viruses include SIV, FIV, Visna and CAEV, which cause diseases in monkeys, cats, sheep and goats. Almost all organisms, including most viruses, store their genetic material on long strands of DNA.Retroviruses are the exception because their genes are composed of RNA (Ribonucleic Acid).

RNA has a very similar structure to DNA. However, small differences between the two molecules mean that HIV’s replication process is a bit more complicated than that of most other viruses. HIV has just nine genes (compared to more than 500 genes in a bacterium, and around 20,000-25,000 in a human). Three of the HIV genes, called gag, pol and env, contain information needed to make structural proteins for new virus particles. The other six genes, known as tat, rev, nef, vif, vpr and vpu, code for proteins that control the ability of HIV to infect a cell, produce new copies of virus, or cause disease.

At either end of each strand of RNA is a sequence called the long terminal repeat, which helps to control HIV replication.

  1. SOURCE: HOOTONE HEALTH MANAGER 

4 COMMENTS

  1. It is the best time to make some plans for
    the longer term and it is time to be happy. I’ve learn this publish and if I may just I desire
    to recommend you some fascinating issues or advice. Maybe you
    could write subsequent articles regarding this article.
    I desire to learn more issues approximately it! Hey there
    would you mind letting me know which web host you’re using?
    I’ve loaded your blog in 3 different browsers and I
    must say this blog loads a lot faster then most.
    Can you recommend a good hosting provider at a honest price?
    Kudos, I appreciate it! I’ve been browsing online more than three hours
    today, yet I never found any interesting article like yours.

    It is pretty worth enough for me. In my view, if all website owners and bloggers made good content as you did, the net will
    be a lot more useful than ever before. http://cspan.org/